Spinning Silk Workshop

Earlier this week I attended an online workshop run by Katie Weston at Hilltop Cloud on spinning silk fibre. I have very little experience of spinning silk beyond a silk brick preparation I tried a few years ago which ended in complete disaster. I found it impossible to draft and quite ‘messy’ as a prep. After that I stayed well away from pure silk although a do like it in blends.

Back L-R: Eri, Mulberry, Penduncle
Front L-R: Tussah, Sari, Hankie

So this workshop was a great opportunity to try it out again being a little bit older (definitely) and wiser (ish) as a spinner. The workshop looked at tussah, mulberry, penduncle, eri, and sari silks, as well as mulberry silk hankies. We had a good introduction to the silk making process, I had no idea that different silks came from different worms, and Katie was really good at seamlessly manipulating camera views so that we could see her hands during the tutorial sections. We also covered the key differences between types of silk and their properties, with the lack of any crimp at all to mulberry giving it its very lustrous but slippery feel, and the others being a little more textured and easier to handle.

L-R: Tussah, Mulberry, Penduncle, Eri, Hankies, Sari.

These samples were spun from the end of the top with a short backwards draw and a moderate amount of twist. This produced reasonably consistent (for a first attempt!) samples which retained lustre a made for a soft, drapey yarn. Both the hankie and the sari silk made for more textured yarns. I made a singles yarn with the silk hankie although I drafted it out a bit too finely so ended up with a very thin yarn. Despite this it’s reasonably balanced which is a first for me in terms of singles yarns. Silk wants to spin very fine, particularly mulberry, although I found penduncle seemed easier to spin slightly thicker without much effort on my part.

L-R: Tussah, Mulberry, Penduncle, Eri

These were spun longdraw (ish) from the fold, with high twist in both the singles and the ply. The mulberry was very challenging to spin this way and is more of a ‘spin-however-you-can-get-it-on-to-the-bobbin draw’. Mulberry is definitely not my friend yet! Visually I prefer the look of these although the high twist sacrifices some of the softness.

I switched to only spinning tussah blends some time ago having read this was a wild silk where moths were allowed to hatch before the silk was harvested. I now understand that this is not really the case although eri, also known as peace silk, allows for this. However the industry is complicated and, as noted in the workshop, has very long supply chains where it’s not always possible to be accurate about sources. As a vegetarian I’d be much happier being able to buy naturally hatched silk, rather like I only buy angora from small producers I know have excellent welfare standards, but this seems to be a more complicated topic than I realised.

Overall I really enjoyed this workshop and I have plenty of silk left to experiment a little more with different twist levels. I really liked the penduncle and eri, and was surprised to hear that these were both supplied by HTC in their undyed form. The grey/brown of the penduncle is particularly beautiful and I can imagine a very nice shawl or cowl made from this in its undyed state.

Author: ceulanfibres

Knitter. Spinner. Sometimes weaver and dyer.

2 thoughts on “Spinning Silk Workshop”

  1. Your silks all look fabulous. I am yet to try spinning some of the silks I received in a workshop pack, so it’s interesting to read your thoughts. I was vegetarian for nearly 15 years, and then started being pescatarian nearly 20 years ago. I’ve tried to go vegan and have very little dairy as it doesn’t agree with my liver. Where I have always fallen down is sweets with gelatine in and silk. I have come to terms with my hypocrisy and I’m happy with where the line I’ve drawn is. It may not make any logical sense to anyone else and when we got some raw silk that still had some worm casings in I was pretty grossed out, but not enough to stop spinning or wearing it. Everyone needs to make draw their own line they are happy with. Mine just happens to be a wiggly line.

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    1. I think a wiggly line is a great way of looking at it. My winter boots are leather but I drink oat milk. I consider my life a work in progress in all areas! It’s a very lovely fibre even though as spinners we get the lower quality stuff. I feel like I might never get to grips with mulberry silk (no pun intended) but I’d certainly be interested in trying out more penduncle and eri. I’ll be interested to hear what you make of your pack.

      Liked by 1 person

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